AMD Ryzen 5 3400G and Ryzen 3 3200G with specifications leaked, heatspreaders are soldered

AMD Ryzen 3 3200G Ryzen 5 3400G Leak Picasso
(Picture: via Chiphell)

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AMD soon launches the first Ryzen 3000 processors. The APUs Ryzen 5 3400G and Ryzen 3 3200G are the first. Now the specifications leaked out.

AMD launches Ryzen 3000 with APUs

Soon the third generation of Ryzen processors will be launched. With them, Zen 2 and thus the 7nm structure width are introduced into the processors. This enables higher clock rates on the one hand and more economical operation on the other. The top model Ryzen 9 3850X is said to have a boost clock of up to 5.1 GHz. But on how many cores is still questionable. AMD has also increased the number of cores once again.Up to 16 cores are possible with two processor dies and a management chip on one package. Unlike the second Ryzen generation, however, the APUs have no new processor chips, in this case Zen 2 chips. AMD continues to use a combination of Zen+ cores with 12nm structure and Vega graphics unit for the APUs.

As with the last generation, AMD seems to start with APUs first. The Ryzen 5 3400G and the Ryzen 3 3200G are the first two desktop processors of the Ryzen 3000 series to come onto the market. This was confirmed by a leak in the next few days when photos of the 3200G were published. The same leaker has now also posted the technical specifications and further details about the 3200G in the Chiphell forum. Surprisingly, data for the Ryzen 5 3400G are also included.

Specifications leaked, Ryzen 5 3400G clockable to 4.25 GHz

The user who was also responsible for the last leak has again published photos of the AMD APUs Ryzen 5 3400G and Ryzen 3200G. However, the post has already disappeared from the Chiphell forum, but wccftech downloaded the pictures early enough. The forum user apparently got samples of the two processors and tested them in many ways.

AMD Ryzen 3 3200G Ryzen 5 3400G Leak Picasso
(Picture: via Chiphell)

Let’s start with the specifications. Compared to its predecessors Ryzen 5 2400G and Ryzen 3 2200G, little has changed. The cache of both APUs remains at 4 megabytes, the 3200G continues to come with four cores and four threads. The 3400G still has four cores and eight threads. There seem to be differences in the clock rates. The user did not post the actual clock rates, but overclocked all processors. He clocked the Ryzen 5 3400G to 4.25 GHz processor clock at 1.38 volts and a temperature of 80 degrees Celsius. The predecessor reached only 3.925 GHz at 1.38 Volt and 79 degrees Celsius temperature in the leaker’s test. The Ryzen 3 3200G even clocked at 4.3 GHz with 1.38 volts at 75 degrees Celsius, while its predecessor only clocked at 4.0 GHz at 75 degrees Celsius and the same voltage. On the one hand this can be due to optimizations, on the other hand it can be due to another thing that the user has tested.

The new APUs are soldered

With the Ryzen processors, AMD has again triggered the trend of soldering. All Ryzen CPUs come with a soldered heatspreader. Intel has also been soldering the K-models again since the ninth generation. The only exceptions were the two APUs Ryzen 5 2400G and Ryzen 3 2200G. These were not soldered due to height differences between CPU and GPU, but rather covered with heat conducting paste. AMD seems to have fixed that in the new APU generation. The Chiphell user also tried to delid the Ryzen 3 3200G with a razor blade. Probably he assumed that the APU is equipped with heat conducting paste. However, AMD also seems to solder the new APUS. The user has completely destroyed the Ryzen 3 3200G by his delidding attempt.

The fact that the new APUs are soldered could also explain why they can clock much higher than their predecessors. Of course some structural improvements have been made, but since the architecture is the same as for the second Ryzen generation, there should not have been any major changes. In any case, the soldered heatspreader brings significantly lower temperatures during overclocking and probably also higher reference clock rates.

About Florian Maislinger 1222 Articles
Florian Maislinger is author and founder of PC Builder's Club. As a skilled IT engineer, he is very familiar with computers and hardware and has been a technology lover since childhood. He is mainly responsible for the news and our social media channels.

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